Topics

The Two-Way
10:37 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Palestinian Investigator: Israel Is 'Only Suspect' In Arafat's Death

Oct. 29, 2004: Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat boards a helicopter in the West Bank city of Ramallah en route to a hospital in France. He died weeks later.
Scott Nelson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 11:22 am

A Palestinian investigator says Israel is the "only suspect" in the 2004 death of the late Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat.

"We consider Israel the first, fundamental and only suspect in Yasser Arafat's assassination," Tawfik Tirawi, head of a Palestinian committee looking into the case, said Friday at a news conference in the West Bank town of Ramallah.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:27 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Snowden Reportedly Used Others' Login Info To Get Secret Data

Edward Snowden, who provided secret U.S. intelligence documents to several media outlets, may have duped as many as 25 NSA colleagues into giving him their login information, according to Reuters. He's seen here in an image from an October TV report.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 12:36 pm

Some of the classified documents leaked by Edward Snowden were acquired using the credentials of other NSA workers — including people who had higher security clearance than the former spy agency contractor, according to Reuters. As many as 25 people may have been duped, the news agency says, citing people close to the inquiry.

Snowden reportedly gained his National Security Agency colleagues' trust — and access to documents and data beyond his security clearance — by saying he needed to know their security information as part of his job as a computer systems administrator.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:15 am
Fri November 8, 2013

'60 Minutes' Apologizes For Benghazi Report: 'We Were Wrong'

CBSNews.com

"The truth is that we made a mistake," CBS News correspondent Lara Logan said Friday as she apologized for an Oct. 27 report on 60 Minutes in which a State Department security contractor claimed he had been on the scene of the Sept. 11, 2012, attack at a U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya.

That attack left the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans dead.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:39 am
Fri November 8, 2013

More Jobs Than Expected Added, But Jobless Rate Rose In Oct.

Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 9:12 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's John Ydstie previews the October jobs report

There were 204,000 jobs added to payrolls in October, about 80,000 more than economists expected. But the jobless rate edged up to 7.3 percent from 7.2 percent the month before, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:53 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Strongest Cyclone Ever? Typhoon Haiyan Slams Philippines

From space, Typhoon Haiyan was almost beautiful. On the ground, it wasn't so pretty.
EUMETSAT

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:08 pm

(Click here for our latest update.)

Meteorologists weren't holding back Friday after watching in amazement as Typhoon Haiyan roared over the Philippines with pounding rain and top sustained winds approaching 200 mph as it neared the coast.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:10 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Book News: Claire Vaye Watkins Wins The Dylan Thomas Prize

Claire Vaye Watkins is the author of the short story collection Battleborn.
Riverhead Books

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:55 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Hopes Rising For 'First Step' At Nuclear Talks With Iran

Negotiators at their round table in Geneva, where talks are being held about Iran's nuclear ambitions.
Denis Balibouse Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 11:22 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Geneva

(Click here to jump to updates.)

Read more
The Two-Way
3:05 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Stanford Professor Who Sounded Alert On Multitasking Has Died

The question of how humans process the flood of electronic media was a central part of the work of Stanford University sociology professor Clifford Nass, who died recently. Citing multiple studies, Nass said people often overestimate their ability to multitask.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:51 pm

Clifford Nass, the Stanford University sociologist who helped pioneer studies that undermined ideas about multitasking, has died at age 55. The man who dedicated his career to thinking about how humans live in a digital age died after taking part in a hike near Lake Tahoe Saturday.

At Stanford, Nass was "a larger than life character," his colleague professor Byron Reeves tells NPR's All Things Considered. Reeves says Nass "was just incredibly enthusiastic about his work, about students."

Read more
The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Senate Approves Bill To Add Sexual Orientation To Work Protections

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:34 pm

The Senate has approved the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which gives workplace protections to workers and job applicants who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. The bill would apply to any private employer that has more than 15 employees; it includes an exemption for religious groups.

The measure adding sexual orientation and gender identity to the list of characteristics that cannot be discriminated against in the workplace passed by a vote of 64-32 — a slightly stronger showing than an earlier vote to move forward on the legislation, which passed 61-30.

Read more

Pages