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4:21 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Religious Passion: The Bad Trialogue

KWGS

Extremism: Religious Passion and The Problem of Perception 

Trialogue 2014: The Challenge of Civil Discourse 
Sponsored by the Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice 

This is the second of three public discussions regarding the topic of religious extremism. Learn More

Session Two: The Bad
Sunday, February 9, 2014 • Boston Avenue United Methodist Church, Tulsa, Oklahoma

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10:56 am
Sat February 8, 2014

Radiolab's Jad Abumrad and the Importance of Sound in Our Lives

Lead in text: 
One of the most sound-rich programs aired on Public Radio 89.5-1 combines the talents of two hosts, guests, and natural sound using inventive ways not duplicated in the audio realm. Here's the co-host spilling the secrets of how it's done. (Listen to RadioLab on Tuesdays at noon.)
When Jad Abumrad, the creator of WNYC's Radio Lab, shares one of the first things he remembers hearing as a child, he describes something that most of us would call an annoying noise: a running lawnmower. He describes the sound as something physical.
What's New?
1:49 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Documentaries Of The Week • February 2014

Oklahoma Watch
Watch-Out Forum on Mental Health

Thursday, February 6 • noon & Friday, February 7 • 8 pm

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What's New?
10:42 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Religious Passion: The Good Trialogue

KWGS

Extremism: Religious Passion and The Problem of Perception 

Trialogue 2014: The Challenge of Civil Discourse 
Sponsored by the Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice 

This is the first of three public discussions regarding the topic of religious extremism. Learn More

Session One: The Good
Sunday, February 2, 2014 • Peace Academy, Tulsa, Oklahoma

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What's New?
10:00 am
Thu January 30, 2014

Go Behind The Scenes of "The Monuments Men" on Travel With Rick Steves

This week's Travel with Rick Steves  goes "behind the scenes" of George Clooney's "The Monuments Men" (national premier February 7), and "Doc Martin", one of the most popular dramas shows on public television  (season 6 premiers the week of February 1).

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What's New?
2:44 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Ancient And Vulnerable: 25 Percent Of Sharks And Rays Risk Extinction

Each year, 6 to 8 percent of the global population of sharks and rays gets caught, scientists say. The fish can't reproduce fast enough to keep pace
Mike Johnston Flickr

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 8:23 am

There are more than a thousand species of sharks and rays in the world, and nearly a quarter of them are threatened with extinction, according to a new study. That means these ancient types of fish are among the most endangered animals in the world.

This word comes from a Swiss-based group called the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which maintains the so-called Red List of species threatened with extinction.

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What's New?
2:43 am
Wed January 22, 2014

Gentrification May Actually Be Boon To Longtime Residents

The bustling Sidamo coffee shop in Washington's H Street Northeast neighborhood. The area has attracted many new, young residents and high-end bars, retail and restaurants over the past several years.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 8:34 am

Bobby Foster Jr. can often be found reading the paper on a wooden bench outside Murry's grocery store on the corner of Sixth and H streets northeast in Washington, D.C.

"The sun shines over here this time of day," says Foster, a retired cook. "It's always good when the sun shines."

Murry's has been an anchor in this neighborhood for decades — during the crack wars of the 1980s and the urban blight that followed, when most other businesses packed up and left. Foster has been somewhat of an anchor, too. He's lived here for 54 years.

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What's New?
7:23 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Buying A Detroit House For $500, And Then Explaining Why

A corner in Poletown, the section of Detroit where Drew Philip bought a house for $500.
Courtesy of Garrett MacLean

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 12:43 pm

Drew Philp made waves this month by explaining to the Internet why he bought a house in struggling Detroit for $500. In his much-discussed story for Buzzfeed, Philp said that he is part of "another Detroit," one where people are working to help each other and save their city.

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What's New?
2:55 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Whole Foods Bans Produce Grown With Sludge. But Who Wins?

A woman shops in the produce section at Whole Foods in New York City. The company recently announced it would prohibit produce farmed using biosolids in its stores.
Stephen Chernin/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 5:55 pm

If you've ever shopped at Whole Foods, you've probably noticed that some of the foods it sells claim all kinds of health and environmental virtues. From its lengthy list of unacceptable ingredients for food to its strict rules for how seafood is caught and meat is raised, the company sets a pretty high bar for what is permitted on its coveted shelves.

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What's New?
2:55 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Soba: More Than Just Noodles, It's A Cultural Heritage ... And An Art Form

Genuine soba noodles are difficult to find in the U.S.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 11:10 am

Traditional Japanese cuisine, known as washoku, is now an intangible cultural heritage, according to the United Nations.

Tofu, mochi and miso are a few examples, but it's the buckwheat noodle, or soba, that many consider the humble jewel of Japanese cuisine. It's not easy to find in the U.S., but one Los Angeles woman is helping preserve the craft of making soba.

In a cooking classroom off a busy street in L.A., Sonoko Sakai is teaching about the simplicity of making buckwheat noodles.

"Basically, soba is only two things: flour and water," Sakai explains.

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