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What's New?
8:51 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Move Over Nursing Homes — There's Something Different

There are no strict schedules at Green House homes, so resident Charles Tyler, 72, is free to stay in his recliner in the living room during mealtimes.
Ina Jaffe NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 6:21 pm

One thing just about everyone dreads as they age is the possibility of ending up in a nursing home. We all think we know what that's like: sharing a room with strangers, sitting slumped in a wheelchair all day, rigid schedules, bad smells. And for more than 1 million Americans, this is home. But there's an effort to change all that, and it's known as The Green House Project.

In the past 10 years, more than 140 of these alternative, nonprofit nursing homes have been built in 24 states.

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What's New?
8:51 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Rob Lowe On Playing JFK Without Sounding Like You're On 'The Simpsons'

Rob Lowe as John F. Kennedy in the National Geographic Channel's film, Killing Kennedy.
National Geographic Channel

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 6:51 pm

The National Geographic Channel is a little all over the place when it comes to their programming. There's some nature material, there's some fairly sensational reality stuff (Doomsday Preppers, for instance), and there are historical documentaries and, sometimes, historical scripted films.

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What's New?
6:48 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Hackers Track Their Vital Signs. Sounds Cool, But TMI?

Christopher Hopkins feels amazing, and he's got the data to prove it.
Courtesy of Christopher Hopkins

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:55 pm

Large-scale data mining in health care sounds scary, but dial back that fear for a minute. What about mining your own data to make informed decisions about your day-to-day health?

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What's New?
10:01 am
Tue July 23, 2013

On Digital Dating: Never Committing, And Never Breaking Up

Texting and social media make romantic ties simultaneously easy to avoid and harder to shake.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 4:54 pm

I've been out of the dating world for the past decade, which makes me unqualified to speak from personal experience but intensely curious about how technology has upended courtship conventions. Based on the recent headlines, it seems an interesting paradox has emerged: Texting and social media make romantic ties simultaneously easy to avoid and harder to shake.

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What's New?
10:00 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Unusual Tick-Borne Virus Lurks In Missouri's Woods

A harmful trio (from left): a deer tick, lone star tick and dog tick.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 9:11 am

Last year, scientists got the chance to solve a medical mystery — well, at least half of it. This week the final puzzle pieces fell into place, as investigators tracked the newly identified virus to an eight-legged bug.

The mystery actually began with two Missouri farmers who came down with a strange illness in 2009. They had high fevers, diarrhea and nausea. Their platelet counts dropped dramatically, though they didn't experience any abnormal bleeding.

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What's New?
7:36 am
Tue July 23, 2013

James? George? What Will 'Baby Cambridge' Be Named?

Outside the London hospital where the newest prince was born, betting parlors have been advertising the odds on names.
Chris Jackson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 11:51 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Philip Reeves reports on the royal birth

Now that he's been born, the next big moments in little Baby Cambridge's life will be when he's seen in public and when the world hears what his name will be.

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What's New?
8:57 am
Mon July 22, 2013

'Wringing' Out Personal Bias Is A Daily Exercise

President Barack Obama delivered remarks on the Trayvon Martin case from the White House briefing room Friday.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 3:48 pm

President Obama, in his speech on Friday, said that all of us should do some soul searching.

Not a conversation on race organized by politicians, he said. He suggested smaller and more personal places for those conversations — families, churches and workplaces — and he suggested a conversation that each person could have with him or herself: "Am I wringing as much bias out of myself as I can?"

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What's New?
8:53 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Regional Bias And How NPR Covers America

istockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 1:28 pm

It is a persistent complaint among listeners: NPR has a regional bias, and it favors the East and West coasts.

"It is past time that NPR relocated its headquarters away from Washington, D.C.," admonished Gregory Elmes, a professor at West Virginia University, where he teaches geology and, fittingly, geography. "Somewhere like St. Louis, Mo. or Denver, Co. might provide your reporters, analysts and hosts with a wider perspective representative of a much broader sweep of the United States."

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What's New?
8:53 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Getting Cozy With Baby Butterflies ... So Cozy, They Whisper A Wriggly Secret

YouTube

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 4:00 am

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What's New?
8:53 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Q&A: Director Henry Jaglom, Author Of 'My Lunches With Orson'

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 8:33 am

In the final years of his life, Orson Welles regularly met his friend and business partner Henry Jaglom for lunch in L.A. to discuss future projects, old anecdotes, and Hollywood gossip. Jaglom, a filmmaker in his own right (his work includes A Safe Place, Someone to Love, and Festival in Cannes), kept a tape recorder running in his bag — which Welles requested, according to Jaglom, to accumulate material for an autobiography.

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