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Neal Conan

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's live, midday news-talk program. Host Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape.

From breaking news, science, and education to religion and the arts, Talk of the Nation offers listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

For two hours each Monday through Thursday, Talk of the Nation listeners weigh-in, share their thoughts and ask questions by calling, emailing, messaging through social media.

On Fridays the conversation turns to the topics of science, with Talk of the Nation Science Friday with Ira Flatow, focusing on news and issues about the world of science and technology. For show listings and archives, visit here.

 

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Mon February 6, 2012

The World's 'Responsibility To Protect'

After the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, world leaders vowed that such mass atrocities could never be allowed to happen again. In 2005, the U.N. adopted the Responsibility to Protect, a set of principles to guide the response of the international community if a government fails to protect its population.

NPR Story
12:00 pm
Mon February 6, 2012

Op-Ed: Komen Foundation Needs A New Approach

The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation reversed its controversial decision to stop providing funding to Planned Parenthood. Rodger Jones, an editorial writer for the Dallas Morning Star, says that to retain the support of abortion rights opponents, Komen needs to consider different fundraising options.

NPR Story
12:00 pm
Mon February 6, 2012

Unemployment Numbers Offer Hope And Concern

The jobs numbers at the start of 2012, shed a ray of positivity on a gloomy economic picture. Some economists warn against premature optimism. While the economy is creating jobs again, it will take years to return to full employment.

Around the Nation
12:00 pm
Mon February 6, 2012

Seeking Revenge In 'Underworld Of Vanished Bikes'

The majority of stolen bikes end up for sale on eBay or Craigslist.
iStockphoto.com

In 2006, thieves stole writer Patrick Symmes' bike in broad daylight on a crowded, New York City street. This inspired Symmes to set out to catch a bike thief — any bike thief.

He tells the tale of this revenge-fueled, cross-country journey in the Outside magazine piece "Who Pinched My Ride?" The story is filled with GPS trackers, police stake-outs and undercover stings.

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri February 3, 2012

Listening In On The Brain To Decode Speech

Originally published on Fri February 3, 2012 1:00 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri February 3, 2012

IBEX Spacecraft Intercepts 'Alien' Particles

As it circles Earth, NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer hunts for particles streaming in from beyond the solar system. It has intercepted hydrogen, helium, neon and oxygen atoms. IBEX principal investigator Dave McComas discusses how the abundance of those atoms hints at the Milky Way's composition.

NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri February 3, 2012

What Grosses You Out?

Originally published on Fri February 3, 2012 12:38 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. What grosses you out, the sight of maggots squirming on a rotten piece of meat? How about a cockroach running around your spice cabinet when you turn the lights on at night? How about eating strange organ meat like sweetbreads, pancreas. Maybe just a doorknob is enough to give you the chills, touched by so many hands, or a toilet seat touched by - well, you know, there must be so many germs, right.

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri February 3, 2012

Study Tracks Alzheimer's Progression In Mice

Originally published on Fri February 3, 2012 12:40 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri February 3, 2012

Blue Marble: The Making Of

NASA's iconic images of Earth from space date back to the late 1960s--with snapshots taken by Apollo astronauts. The modern "blue marble" images are captured by machines and they're not photos. They're datasets collected by instruments aboard satellites and then translated into imagery on the ground.

NPR Story
12:00 pm
Fri February 3, 2012

Drone Technology Reaches New Heights

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are replacing boots on the ground in some wars. Commercially, UAVs are being used for things like crop-dusting and flood mapping. Experts discuss advances in drone technology and how to address legal and privacy concerns that stem from their use.

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