Morning Edition on 89.5-1

Weekdays 5am to 9am
Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep

Each morning NPR's Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentary that inform, challenge, and occasionally amuse. Morning Editions is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C. and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and report first hand on the day's most important issues and news. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host. For information on a recent story, or the most recent broadcast, click here.

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Asia
3:37 am
Tue May 1, 2012

China Suppresses Coverage Of Two News Stories

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 9:05 am

Two stories out of China — the escape of a blind dissident from house arrest and the corruption scandal involving a top politician and his family — have attracted international attention. But inside China, the picture is different. The government has successfully suppressed the story about the dissident, Chen Guangcheng, such that most Chinese have never even heard of him. The Communist Party has waged a smear campaign against the fallen official, Bo Xilai, whom citizens see as a loser in a power struggle, a corrupt politician or both.

Author Interviews
3:37 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Caro Writes Alone Among Bookshelves, Filing Cabinets

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 5:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The writer Robert Caro has spent about 35 years writing about President Lyndon Johnson and he still isn't done. As we heard on the program yesterday, Caro has come out with his fourth book on Johnson's life.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Years ago, one reviewer noted that Caro's research was so exhaustive that his book on Johnson's youth in Texas described the average annual rainfall in the Texas hill country in the years before Johnson was even born.

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Business
3:37 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Caring For Sick Or Elderly Is Tough On The Wallet

Cheryl Matheis is senior vice president for policy at the AARP.
Courtesy of Cheryl Matheis, AARP

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 11:26 am

The average caregiver is 49 years old. Cheryl Matheis, senior vice president for policy at AARP, tells Steve Inskeep when a worker has to leave their job to care for a relative, they lose on average $325,000 in lifetime income — from lost wages, Social Security and pensions.

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Business
3:37 am
Tue May 1, 2012

Bank Of America To Lay Off More Workers

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 6:23 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with more job cuts at Bank of America.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The Wall Street Journal reports that the nation's second-largest bank is planning about 2,000 layoffs at its investment banking, commercial banking and wealth management units. These cuts are notable because they include high-earning employees in operations that account for most of Bank of America's profits since the financial crisis.

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Europe
3:37 am
Tue May 1, 2012

British Parliament To Issue Report On Phone-Hacking Scandal

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 6:26 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Over the course of more than 60 years in the media business, Rupert Murdoch has earned a reputation as a blunt-spoken businessman who comes out swinging. Well today, British parliamentarians didn't pull their punches against him. They released the findings of an investigative panel that spent months looking into the illegal phone-hacking practices at Murdoch's News of the World, the now-closed British tabloid.

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Music Interviews
6:02 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

How To Break Up With Attitude, According To Norah Jones

Norah Jones' latest album is called Little Broken Hearts.
Frank Ockenfels Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 7:38 am

More than 10 years ago, Norah Jones hit the national stage with her melancholic love song "Don't Know Why," in the process selling millions of copies of her debut album and becoming a Grammy winner.

But Jones' new album is different. She may sound like a fragile performer, but don't get her wrong: At 33, she's recorded a breakup album with attitude.

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Business
7:01 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Barnes & Noble, Microsoft Team Up In E-Publishing

Microsoft is committing $300 million to the venture with Barnes & Noble. They are working to create a new subsidiary of the bookseller. The two companies are hoping to energize sales of the Nook tablet.

Asia
6:23 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Wealthy Australian To Build 21st Century Titanic

Clive Palmer says he wants to build Titanic II to sale from London to New York. Like the builder of the original, Palmer says, "It is going to be designed so it won't sink."

Europe
6:12 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Paragliding Centenarian Regains World Record

Peggy McAlpine wasn't happy when she lost her world record. The Scottish woman was 100 when she became the oldest person to paraglide. That title was recently taken away by an American woman. So at age 104, McAlpine took the the skies again and regained the record.

Asia
4:23 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Two Crises Highlight China's Social Media Struggles

Blind lawyer Chen Guangcheng, seen in this image from a YouTube video, escaped last week after 19 months under house arrest. Searches for his name are banned on China's Twitter-like services.
AP

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 8:13 am

China is clamping down on social media as it grapples with a crisis over the escape of a high-profile dissident, apparently to U.S. protection. The case presents new difficulties for a Chinese leadership already struggling to deal with the scandalous downfall of a powerful politician, and it complicates U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's visit to Beijing this week.

Yet China's use of social media in dealing with these two recent crises has been a study in contrasts.

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