Morning Edition on 89.5-1

Weekdays 5am to 9am
Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep

Each morning NPR's Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentary that inform, challenge, and occasionally amuse. Morning Editions is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C. and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and report first hand on the day's most important issues and news. While they are out traveling, David Greene can be heard as regular substitute host. For information on a recent story, or the most recent broadcast, click here.

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The End Of The Space Shuttle Era
2:42 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Shuttle Endeavour Begins Long Voyage To New Home

Workers remove a tree from a median in the middle of Manchester Boulevard in Inglewood, Calif., on Sept. 4 to make room for Endeavour.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:11 am

Space shuttle Endeavour begins a kind of farewell tour this week. The shuttle will set off on a cross-country trip to its retirement home, flying from Florida to Los Angeles on the back of a modified jumbo jet.

Along the way, the spaceship will stop off in Houston, home of NASA's Mission Control and, weather permitting, fly over NASA centers and various landmarks in cities that include San Francisco and Sacramento.

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The Salt
2:36 am
Tue September 18, 2012

It's No Yolk: Mexicans Cope With Egg Shortage, Price Spikes

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:22 pm

There is a new crisis in Mexico. It's not the ongoing drug war or a plunge in the peso: It's eggs.

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Author Interviews
2:36 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Becoming 'Anton,' Or, How Rushdie Survived A Fatwa

Salman Rushdie's other novels include Midnight's Children, Shame and Luka and the Fire of Life." href="/post/becoming-anton-or-how-rushdie-survived-fatwa" class="noexit lightbox">
Salman Rushdie's other novels include Midnight's Children, Shame and Luka and the Fire of Life.
Syrie Moskowitz Random House

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:04 am

The recent violence sparked by the film Innocence of Muslims recalls a very different controversy from more than 20 years ago:

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Author Interviews
2:35 am
Tue September 18, 2012

In 'Season,' One Plantation's Double Murder Mystery

Attica Locke is the also the author of Black Water Rising, a murder mystery set in a racially divided Houston.
Jenny Walters Harper

Originally published on Sat September 22, 2012 5:35 am

When it comes to healing the wounds of its troubled racial past, the United States is still in its "adolescent phase," says novelist Attica Locke. The 2008 presidential election changed everything she had been taught about race, she says — and, as an African-American writer, she felt compelled to write about that new reality. The result is The Cutting Season, a thrilling, century-spanning story of two murders.

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The Two-Way
10:24 am
Mon September 17, 2012

China Ratchets Up The Rhetoric In Island Spat With Japan

Protesters marched in front of the Japanese Embassy in Beijing today. They carried a banner declaring: "We are proud of China's rise. We resolutely oppose Japan's rightist forces."
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

China's state-run media is warning that Japan could endure another "lost decade" of economic stagnation should Beijing resort to trade retaliation over Japan's purchase of disputed islands.

The warning comes amid a surge of anti-Japanese nationalism across China that sparked huge and sometimes violent protests over the weekend. As the economic cost of the protests begins to escalate, it's becoming clearer exactly who might be behind them.

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Politics
9:16 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Obama Launching China Trade Case

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

President Obama will launch a new trade enforcement case against China Monday, using the power of incumbency to counter Republican Mitt Romney's criticism that he is ceding American jobs to the Asian power.

Around the Nation
6:31 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Chicago's O'Hare Needs Help Clearing Brush

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with a job opening at Chicago's O'Hare airport. Wanted: One herder with a flock of sheep, or goats are OK too. The Sun Times reports that O'Hare is looking for 25 grazing animals to clear out overgrown bushes surrounding the airport. Those bushes attract birds, which are dangerous to aircraft. O'Hare requires the herder to bring a mobile electronic fence to keep his herd off the runway, though apparently a shepherd's crook is optional. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Asia
6:25 am
Mon September 17, 2012

South Korean Men Embrace Makeup, Skin Care

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. South Korea is a conservative society where men are dominant and also wear lots of makeup. A market research firm finds that this one small nation consumes more than 20 percent of the world's male skin care products. An AP reporter describes women applying lipstick to men, security guards behind layers of makeup and male flight attendants attending makeup class. A popular South Korean catch phrase is: Appearance is power. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

World
4:01 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Protests Continue Against Anti-Islam Film

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

We begin this morning in the Middle East. The violent protests outside U.S. diplomatic missions in the region - sparked by a roughly made film insulting Muhammad - have ebbed.

INSKEEP: There is still plenty of tension, and in Kabul today, police held back more than 1,000 people who took to the streets throwing rocks at the police and chanting anti-American slogans.

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Business
4:01 am
Mon September 17, 2012

White House To Launch Trade Case Against China

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A trade dispute between the U.S. and China is at the top of NPR's business news.

The United States has filed a complaint against China with the World Trade Organization. Washington charges that China subsidizes its cars and auto parts, giving it an unfair trade advantage over U.S. automakers.

This move comes as President Obama campaigns in Ohio today. Ohio is a political swing state and a place where many jobs rely on the auto industry.

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