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Sports
2:00 pm
Fri April 6, 2012

Collegiate 'Boat Race' A British Institution

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Three hundred thousand people are expected to line the River Thames in London tomorrow with millions more watching on TV. The reason? The 158th Annual Oxford Cambridge Boat Race.

Vicki Barker reports on what has become a British institution.

VICKI BARKER, BYLINE: Unloading kegs and kegs of beer, Richmond Hughes manages The Ship Pub in Hammersmith, a prime viewing position for the race. Hughes expects 5,000 people to jam his riverside garden tomorrow to watch the men from Oxford and Cambridge Universities compete.

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Commentary
2:00 pm
Fri April 6, 2012

Week In Politics: Republican Primaries

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

To talk more about this, we're having our weekly political commentator David Brooks of the New York Times weigh in and filling in for E.J. Dionne is Clarence Page, columnist for the Chicago Tribune. Welcome gentlemen.

CLARENCE PAGE: Hi, Audie.

DAVID BROOKS: Good to be here.

CORNISH: So let's get going with those job numbers. Setback for the president, meaningful setback, David?

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Remembrances
2:00 pm
Fri April 6, 2012

Long-Distance Runner Was 'Indomitable Seeker'

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, we remember the man known as Caballa Blanco, or the White Horse.

MICAH TRUE: I started running a long time ago and I am an ultra-distance runner - is what people call it, but I just call it - I like to run.

CORNISH: That's Micah True in an interview with Runners World last year. True was a long distance runner made famous by Christopher McDougall's non-fiction bestseller "Born To Run: A Hidden Tribe, Super Athlete and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen."

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The Salt
1:44 pm
Fri April 6, 2012

Guerrilla Grafters Bring Forbidden Fruit Back To City Trees

Guerrilla grafter Tara Hui grafts a fruiting pear branch onto an ornamental fruit tree in the San Francisco Bay Area. She doesn't want the location known because the grafting is illegal.
Lonny Shavelson for NPR

Originally published on Sat April 7, 2012 6:00 am

Spring means cherry, pear and apple blossoms. But in many metropolitan areas, urban foresters ensure those flowering fruit trees don't bear fruit to keep fallen fruit from being trampled into slippery sidewalk jelly.

But a group of fruit fans in the San Francisco Bay Area is secretly grafting fruit-bearing tree limbs onto those fruitless trees.

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The Picture Show
1:26 pm
Fri April 6, 2012

Not Your Average Prom Portraits

David Alagem and Lorraine Nicholson, Los Angeles, 2008
Courtesy of Mary Ellen Mark

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:54 am

Prom season is here. And there really isn't a more hyped event in high school social life. There's the fashion, the flowers, plans for the future and, of course, the after party. Photographer Mary Ellen Mark, now 72, recalls her 1958 prom with fondness.

"There I was, looking so perfect and happy facing my future," she tells NPR host Audie Cornish. "I was fascinated by my own prom pictures."

Hence her latest book: Prom, a collection of 127 portraits from 13 schools across the country, shot between 2006 and 2009.

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Classics in Concert
1:24 pm
Fri April 6, 2012

Beethoven's String Quartet of Transcendence

The Emerson Quartet play Beethoven at the Savannah Music Festival. From left: Philip Setzer, Eugene Drucker, David Finckel and Lawrence Dutton
Frank Stewart Savannah Music Festival

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 4:37 pm

Beethoven's String Quartet Of Transcendence

In the spring of 1825, when Beethoven was 54, he became terribly sick. He was in bed for a month and he wrote to his doctor, "I am not feeling well ... I am in great pain." The doctor put Beethoven on a strict regimen, warning, "No wine, no coffee, no spices of any kind." The doctor also advised Beethoven to get away from the city to where he could find fresh air and "natural milk."

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Book Reviews
1:03 pm
Fri April 6, 2012

100 Years Later, Titanic Lives On In Letters

The ill-fated Titanic rests at Harland and Wolff's shipyard, Belfast, in February 1912.
Topical Press Agency Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 5:23 pm

When I hear the word "Titanic," I picture a tuxedoed Leonardo DiCaprio, waiting at the bottom of a gilded staircase while the voice of Celine Dion swells in my mind. It's all Edwardian glitz and glamour, decadence and passionate love, the kind best enjoyed in a dark theater with plenty of popcorn. And then I quickly remember that the ship sinks, and that Titanic is more than just an epic film from my youth. On April 15, a century will have passed since the ship plummeted into the icy Atlantic, and it is the tragedy we should remember, not just the mythology surrounding it.

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Economy
12:49 pm
Fri April 6, 2012

For Long-Term Unemployed, Help Is Running Out

Job seekers line up to enter a career fair in Los Angeles. Both Congress and states are cutting back on unemployment benefits.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Diane Turner can't find work. She spent 30 years managing dental practices in Sonoma County, north of San Francisco, but lost her last job in that field a couple of years ago.

She worked for a while greeting customers at an auto body shop, but lost that job a year ago. "It was very depressing," Turner says. "I always worked, and I was always able to get a job."

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Shots - Health Blog
12:19 pm
Fri April 6, 2012

Spotting Dyslexia May Be Possible Even Before Kids Learn To Read

How to test reading ability in children who can't read has been a problem for researchers.
f_ iStockphoto.com

For people with dyslexia, problems recognizing words can make life difficult. Children usually aren't diagnosed until elementary school, when it becomes clear they're struggling with reading. But scientists say it could be possible to diagnose and help kids much earlier by identifying problems with visual attention — long before they learn to read.

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The Two-Way
12:02 pm
Fri April 6, 2012

Reports: F-18 Fighter Jet Crashes In Virginia Beach

The burning fuselage of an F/A-18 Hornet lies smoldering after crashing into a residential building in Virginia Beach, Va. on Friday.
AP

A Navy fighter jet crashed into an apartment complex in Virginia Beach on Friday afternoon. Television images showed thick, black smoke billowing near a row of apartment buildings.

Update at 8:24 a.m. ET April 7. No Fatalities, Officials Confirm

Fire officials say they have accounted for everyone who lived at an apartment complex in Virginia where a Navy fighter jet crashed on Friday.

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