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The Two-Way
11:03 am
Fri September 28, 2012

No Evidence Yet Of Jimmy Hoffa Under That Michigan Driveway

In Roseville, Mich., officials carry away a soil sample taken from under a driveway where a tipster says a body was buried decades ago — raising speculation that it might be Jimmy Hoffa.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

So far, at least, the dirt beneath a driveway in Roseville, Mich., isn't turning up any sign that former Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa was buried there 37 years ago.

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History
11:03 am
Fri September 28, 2012

The Fight To Desegregate Ole Miss, 50 Years Later

James Meredith is escorted by U.S. Marshals. A riot broke out in 1962 when Meredith tried to enroll at the University of Mississippi.
AP

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 4:59 pm

On Sept. 30, 1962, chaos broke out at the University of Mississippi — also known as Ole Miss — after an African-American man named James Meredith attempted to enroll.

That night, students and other protesters took to the streets, burning cars and throwing rocks at the federal marshals who were tasked with protecting Meredith. By the time the riot was over, observers said the grounds looked like a war zone, and the smell of tear gas hung in the air.

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The Two-Way
10:43 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Due To Threat, University Barred Colorado Shootings Suspect, Prosecutors Say

James Holmes in a Sept. 20 sheriff's photo.
Arapahoe County Sheriff's Office Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 12:08 pm

The man charged with killing 12 people and wounding 58 others at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater on July 20 threatened a University of Colorado psychiatrist about six weeks before the massacre and was barred from campus "as a result of those actions," according to local prosecutors.

They also say in court documents released this morning that James Holmes' alleged threat was reported to university police at the time.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:37 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Orchestra Strikes, The Winter Of 'Spring For Music' And A Fertile Face For Opera

Riccardo Muti leading the Chicago Symphony in happier times.
Todd Rosenberg courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra
  • The biggest news of the week was the walkout at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, which forced the cancellation of the first Saturday night concert of the 2012-13 season. Management and the players wrestled over players' health care contributions. How does their compensation stack up, you may ask? "The current average salary of CSO musicians, who have a base salary of $145,000, is $173,000.
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Middle East
10:33 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Should The World Brace For An Iran-Israel War?

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 10:50 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, violence erupted at the University of Mississippi 50 years ago when an African-American student tried to enroll. We'll look back on that day in just a few minutes.

But, first, to the United Nations. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said yesterday, the only way to prevent Iran from attaining a nuclear bomb is to draw a clear red line.

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Live in Concert
10:15 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Efterklang With Wordless Music Orchestra, Live In Concert

Efterklang performs with Wordless Music Orchestra at the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Ryan Muir for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 12:00 pm

The Danish art-rock trio Efterklang took the stage with the Wordless Music Orchestra at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Thursday for this, the American premiere of music from the band's album Piramida.

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The Two-Way
9:46 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Apple Is 'Extremely Sorry' For Its Much-Maligned Maps, CEO Tim Cook Says

Will it take you where you want to go? A new iPhone 5 and Apple's new mapping software.
Beck Diefenbach Reuters /Landov

How much of a "public relations disaster" has Apple's new mapping software been?

Big enough that the famously proud company has apologized — and suggested that users can turn to arch rival Google Maps instead.

In a message "to our customers" posted this morning, CEO Tim Cook says:

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The Salt
9:08 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Some Grumble About Change As School Lunches Get Leaner And Greener

Michelle Kloser, School Nutrition Director for the West Salem School District in Wisconsin took this picture of Thursday's lunch, which includes baked chicken and rosemary potatoes.
Michelle Kloser for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 12:16 pm

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Shots - Health Blog
8:50 am
Fri September 28, 2012

'Cocaine For Snowblindness': What Polar Explorers Packed For First Aid

From left: Frank Wild, Ernest Shackleton, Dr. Eric Marshall and Jameson Adams head back to base camp after getting within 97 miles of the South Pole — closer than anyone had gotten before them — in January 1909.
Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 10:12 am

So you're headed out to explore the frozen wilderness of the Antarctic, facing one of the most punishing climates on Earth. What kind of medical supplies do you strap onto your sledge in case of emergency, miles from any sign of civilization?

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The Two-Way
8:33 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Bank Of America To Pay $2.43 Billion To Settle Class Action Lawsuit

Bank of America's corporate center in Charlotte, N.C.
Scott Olson Getty Images

While denying it did anything wrong, Bank of America announced this morning it will pay "$2.43 billion and institute certain corporate governance policies ... to settle a class action lawsuit brought in 2009 on behalf of investors who purchased or held Bank of America securities at the time the company announced plans to acquire Merrill Lynch."

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